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Maryland Cracker Barrel Magazine
​Window to Yesterday: 
The Flour Sack
By Colleen B. Hubert
Reminisce with us as we look back on the memories of a few of Washington County's residents. Excerpts featured here are from the current Fall 2018 issue.
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Maryland Cracker Barrel Magazine: Sentinel of Washington County's Heritage
"IN THAT LONG AGO TIME WHEN THINGS WERE SAVED,
WHEN ROADS WERE GRAVELED AND BARRELS WERE STAVED,
WHEN WORN-OUT CLOTHING WAS USED AS RAGS,
AND THERE WERE NO PLASTIC WRAP OR BAGS,
AND THE WELL AND THE PUMP WERE WAY OUT BACK
A VERSATILE ITEM, WAS THE FLOUR SACK......"
"...Our first home was one-half of the upper floor over the local hardware store.  The kitchenette was as wide as our table; the bedroom held a double bed and one dresser; our living room contained a couch, two chairs and a coffee table.  It was cramped, but we managed.  Our church then purchased a row house, 1315 Decatur Street, Baltimore, Maryland, near Fort McHenry.  With our expanding family, Katherine, our first baby had her own room.  This form stone house looked like most traditional old Baltimore houses; however, this parsonage had a fancy bar in the basement, to the amazement of our friends.  When we purchased an automatic washer (no more trekking to the laundromat), the service man installing the washer said. 'Lady, do you want this washer to last a long time?' 'Yes. Of course.' 'You turn the water off every time you use it. It saves the bearing.'  This Sears and Roebuck employee has helped us extend the life of our washing machines by years.  The present one is over 20 years old and going strong.  I am greatly indebted to the unnamed Baltimore service guy for our long-lasting washing machines...."

"In those days there were no cafeterias in the schools.  Many of us took our lunch in lunch boxes.  We used to buy the bread for our school lunch sandwiches instead of using the homemade bread we had at home. In nice weather, we sat in groups on the playground to eat.  On other days we ate at our desks.  
Since we had an hour for lunch, many of the children who lived in town walked home for lunch.  (In those days, mothers didn’t work away from home.)  About once a week, I walked to Grandmother Line’s house for lunch.  My favorite lunch was chipped beef gravy on toast.  We had a large playground which we used when we finished our lunch.  We had two fifteen minute recess periods, one in the morning and one in the afternoon.  These were unsupervised play periods.  (We had no physical education teachers either.)  We had swings, see-saws, and a chinning bar.  But we played all kinds of games. A favorite was prisoner’s base.  It was a running game with two opposing sides.  One side tried to free those held prisoner by the opposing team by tagging them when they ran off their base.  Other games were 'May I' and 'Blind Man’s Bluff'.  We had many singing circle games like 'Farmer in the Dell', 'Round the Mulberry Bush', 'Drop the Handkerchief' and 'London Bridge'.  The boys played marbles and lots of baseball.  The girls liked to jump rope.  At the end of the playground, where the side of a hill had been cut away for the pavement, there were rocks with many crevices in them.  We liked to “play house” there.  We used the two parts of acorns (lots of oak trees there) as cups and saucers.  The crevices were cupboards or stoves or tables.  Some of us also brought toy dishes from home.  There was no running water at the school.  We took turns carrying water in buckets from wells at the houses of people who lived nearby...." 
Pausing to Ponder: 
Our Homes -- Almost Heaven
By Linda Perry
Readin', Writin', 'Rithmetic:
Remembering Keedysville School
From the Journal of Mary Coffman Crampton
Pausing to Ponder: 
Colonial Hardwood Flooring Company Rises from Ashes of Danzer's Lumber Mill
By Richard E. Clem
"...The founder and former owner of Colonial Hardwood, William 'Bill' Danzer, was born in  Hagerstown, June 3, 1880.  At an early age, Bill Danzer saw the economical future in the lumber business and by mid-life had investments in the lumber industry in four different states.  In the early 1930s, Mr. Danzer owned and operated a large lumber company in Hagerstown’s west end at the corner of Madison Avenue and West Washington Street on Washington Square called simply: 'The William A. Danzer Company.'  An article appearing in a local newspaper reported a steam locomotive, on a siding of the Western Maryland Railway in the west end of Hagerstown, accidentally struck one of its own cabooses which caught fire and spread to Danzer’s lumber mill.  A Maryland Court of Appeals ordered the Western Maryland Railway to pay Danzer $250,000 for the 'total loss of a mill, storage sheds, office building and several other structures.'  Another report mentioned, 'William A. Danzer will rebuild on the same Madison Avenue site,as soon as fire insurance company adjusters complete their surveys.'  The exact date construction started is unknown, but after Danzer salvaged and repaired some machinery from the fire, he rebuilt the lumber plant calling it: 'The Colonial Hardwood Flooring Company....'"
(MDCB File Photo)
Courtesy Linda Jessee
Courtesy Sue Gemeny
Courtesy Western MD Room of WCFL
Courtesy Western MD Room of WCFL
Courtesy Linda Jessee
Courtesy Linda Jessee
Courtesy Linda Jessee
Courtesy Jay R. Everly
Courtesy Linda Perry
Courtesy Linda Perry
Courtesy Linda Perry
Courtesy Linda Perry
Courtesy Linda Perry
Courtesy Linda Perry
Courtesy Linda Perry
Courtesy Linda Perry
Courtesy Linda Perry
Courtesy Edwin "Butch" Pryor
Courtesy Edwin "Butch" Pryor
Courtesy Edwin "Butch" Pryor
Courtesy Edwin "Butch" Pryor
Courtesy Edwin "Butch" Pryor
Courtesy Jim and Judith Reichard