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Maryland Cracker Barrel Magazine
​Pausing to Ponder: 
As the Moon Shines 
Over Frog Hollow
By Carl Byrd
Reminisce with us as we look back on the memories of a few of Washington County's residents. Excerpts featured here are from the current Winter 2018 issue.
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Maryland Cracker Barrel Magazine: Sentinel of Washington County's Heritage
"Some parts of southern Washington County are relatively unknown to many people in the tri-state area, but this area has a fascinating history and folklore that needs to be told. People throughout the county, state, and even the country recognize the names of Sharpsburg and Antietam from the famous Civil War battle fought in September 1862. However, few know the small localities beyond Sharpsburg -- communities like Antietam Furnace, Frog Hollow, Dargan, Samples Manor and Sandy Hook...."
"Sometime in 1872, Samuel W. Crawford drifted into Hancock. The stranger, then in his early 30s was “accompanied by a handsome young woman” and brought with him “a lot of trained mice, canary birds, &c.” Later on, gossips would say that he came from a respectable Allegheny City, PA, family but had rejected his kin’s narrow path of life for the pleasures of the broad way; having at least seven wives scattered throughout the country. For a few months, things went well for the pair, but one day a Washington County deputy sheriff arrived in Hancock carrying a letter from Ohio. The lawman went throughout town asking a number of citizens about “a girl whose descriptive list was filled by Crawford’s female companion.” When Sam heard that the officer was searching for his paramour, he sent her packing swiftly. Not long afterward, Crawford crossed the Potomac and took up residence in Berkeley Springs, WV: It seems that for a year or so the mysterious outsider, sometimes known as H.H Harrison or Lewis Crone, stayed out of trouble. Finally, though, the disappearance of “$800 worth of carriage harness stolen from the private stables of visitors to the Springs,” caused many townsfolk to suspect the shady character of the crime. Some even opined that Crawford belonged to a gang of interstate horse thieves...." 
"Originally established in 1928 as E. E. Cronise Mountain Fruit Stand by Esbey and Annie Cronise, they opened the farmers market next door to their homestead. The Cronise family grew produce on the family farm and 100-acre orchard which were located in the Boonsboro area. They also operated their own trucking company which they utilized to truck surplus produce to large cities such as Baltimore and Washington D.C. Customers still travel many miles just to get some of those delicious lopes and melons when in season. The Cronise family also sold its produce at the Hagerstown City Market. Although some of the old structures such as the packing shed, barn, and original flower shop and greenhouses have disappeared over time, the “core” fruit stand still remains and has become a seasonal attraction for both locals and travelers passing through. Over time it has expanded to meet customer needs. Now known as Cronise Market Place it is still family-owned and operated by Bonnie Pereschuk (granddaughter of Esbey Cronise) and her husband, Cliff...."
Accounts of Yore: 
Morgan County Justice -- 
The Lynching of Dr. Crawford
By Steve French
Nostalgic Moments: 
Cronise Market Place --
90 Years and Counting
By Bonnie Pereschuk
Courtesy Lloyd "Pete" Waters
Courtesy Department of Information Technology -- Geographic information Service -- Washington County, MD
Courtesy Lloyd "Pete" Waters
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Boonsboro Museum / Doug Bast
Courtesy Boonsboro Museum / Doug Bast
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Morning Herald, 12-5-1929
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Bonnie Pereschuk
Courtesy Morgan County Historical Society
Courtesy Steve French
Courtesy Boonsboro Museum / Doug Bast