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Maryland Cracker Barrel Magazine
Window to Yesterday -- Hagerstown's East End: 
Rich in History and Memories
By Carl Byrd
Reminisce with us as we look back on the memories of a few of Washington County's residents. Excerpts featured here are from the current Spring 2018 issue.
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Maryland Cracker Barrel Magazine: Sentinel of Washington County's Heritage
“No overview of the East End would be complete without a discussion of the Fairgrounds. The common question among us was, 'What unique and creative ways can get us into The Great Hagerstown Fair free?' .... The stables used to be right next to the fence by the park, so kids would jump or climb on the roof of the stables to get into the Fairgrounds. The Fairgrounds had guards (during Fair week) who would watch for kids jumping off the stable roofs to get into the Fairgrounds. The kids would gain great delight in outmaneuvering the guards by shifting to unpatrolled areas and thus outwitting the guards. We knew most of the spots with holds under the fence from fetching baseballs that would be fouled off into the Fairgrounds area from East End Park. Imagine our dismay one year when Fair officials got particularly nasty and placed broken glass and tar in the fence holes. As children we would often stay up past midnight so we could legitimately get into the Fair for free....." 
"Who would have guessed that a railroad strike would lead to generations of Hagerstonians enjoying delicious ice cream! Randy McElwee, the grandson of William Herbert McElwee, recalled memories of Superior Dairy and its history during an interview on July 13, 2017. William Herbert McElwee worked for the Western Maryland Railroad. There was a strike in the late 1920s, and rather than cross the picket lines, Mr. McElwee decided to start a new career. He entered into a partnership with a Mr. Landis who had a dairy business. They called their dairy L & M Dairy. In the early 1930s Mr. McElwee bought out Mr. Landis and renamed his business Superior Dairy...." 

"One happy memory I have of winter mornings was getting the carton of milk out of our milk box on the back porch. I loved really cold milk, and on particularly frigid mornings, the milk actually had ice in it and it was delightfully cold and delicious. That little insulated milk box sat on the corner of our back porch, right above the steps. The inside was tan in color and inscribed on the inside of the lid were the words 'The man who made this box never saw it.' Washington Society for the Blind. As a child I was fascinated with the idea of someone making something as special as that little milk box without being able to see it. Most customers never saw the man who delivered their milk, rain or shine. When we went out to the porch in the mornings, we just knew it would be there​..."
Pausing to Ponder: 
Railroad Strike = New Career 
By Vickie Martin Layton
I Remember When: 
The Milkmen of Superior Dairy
By Vickie Martin Layton
Courtesy Carol Miller-Schultz
Courtesy Western MD Room of Washington County Free Library (WCFL)
Courtesy Western MD Room of Washington County Free Library
Courtesy Washington County Historical Society
Courtesy Brian Griffith
Courtesy Carol Miller-Schultz
MDCB File Photo
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Mary Diseati Russell
Herald Mail Files
Courtesy Mary Diseati Russell
Courtesy Carla and George Kann
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Carl Byrd
Courtesy Carl Byrd
MDCB File Photo
Courtesy Vickie Layton
MDCB File Photo
MDCB File Photo
MDCB File Photo
MDCB File Photo
MDCB File Photo
MDCB File Photo
Courtesy Hartman Family Collection